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 Sustainability

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Greening Away the Urban Blues: An interview with Marcia McNally
    Green City Project interviewed Marcia McNally of Urban Ecology to learn more about their publication, Blueprint For A Sustainable Bay Area. They talked with Marcia about her favorite projects, ways we can all engage in sustainable practices, and how the Bay Area can become a more environmentally and socially just place in which to live.

Wendell Berry: good neighborliness & technology
    Kentucky farmer, grandfather and educator Wendell Berry is a winner of a Guggenheim Foundation Fellowship, a National Institute of Arts and Letters Award and a Lannan Foundation Award, all for his writings. He is the author of many books, including What Are People For?, The Gift of the Good Land, The Hidden Wound, Another Turn of the Crank and The Memory of Old Jack.


 Bioregionalism

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Bioregionalism Comes to Japan: An Interview with Peter Berg
    展hat hope do we have? How should we go about it? As an activist-thinker in a situation such as talking to a university class or a group of businessmen or public policy people, I simply try to create a mental condition that will have the effect of an explosion in their brain. I could talk paradigm-talk all day, and it would bore me. I try to set off a large-scale explosion in the mind of the person or audience I知 dealing with. If I知 lucky and the explosion does occur, I don稚 know where the pieces are going to settle. The reason I知 doing this is because I feel as though I知 an agent provocateur who is pursuing his own survival in a trance-driven society that wants to deprive me of any of the little measly human-natural interactive possibilities that I can experience. That really is where I知 at.

敵eography of Nowhere Author James Howard Kunstler
    展hat 僧akes a civil place is the 祖onnective tissue of traditional town and city layouts. Instead, architects are designing buildings with little relation to nearby buildings or the street, often presenting blank, unfriendly walls, 奏errible buildings that degrade the street...(designed as if) buildings are TVs. The only important side is the front.
    禅he outside doesn稚 matter. That is the principal idea being sent by architects to people in this country. The message this conveys to people, he added, 訴s they do not matter either.樗

On creating a sustainable regional future
A dialogue with Northwest Environment Watch founder Alan Thein Durning
    典hree years ago Alan Thein Durning left Worldwatch Institute in Washington, D.C., to return to his native place, Seattle. Durning had two prime reasons for his move. First, he sees the source of planet-transforming change coming from the roots of bioregion and community. Second, he views the Pacific Northwest as having unique potential to build a regional sustainability model of planetary significance.

Restoring Your Local Watershed: An Interview with Freeman House
    溺any areas of the West have already been exploited and abandoned, leaving local people to cope with the aftermath. In northern California's Mattole Valley, an eight-year-old restoration project is now beginning to pay dividends -- both for the watershed and the consciousness of the people. Freeman House, one of the prime movers of the Mattole Restoration Council, explains how they have approached such restoration and the philosophy behind their work.

Toward a Ritual, Story and Culture of Ecological Restoration:
An Interview With Bill Jordan, the 善oet of Restoration By Patrick Mazza
    的 really do believe restoration can be the flagship of a new relationship with nature. I think that is happening. The job really is to build a culture. We are trying to build communities with cultures that are capable of negotiating that nature-culture relationship. Our culture has deficiencies in that area. It doesn稚 interest me very much to say we致e blown it. The relationship between nature and culture has always been a problem for people. It痴 a problem for us and we池e thinking hard about it. I think we池e going to do something about it. Restoration provides us with an important means.
    We致e been very weak at having the means to negotiate the nature-culture relationship. We haven稚 had the kind of dealing with nature in the physical sense on which you have to ground a relationship. Even a generation ago a lot of people lived on farms. Before that a lot of people were fishing and hunting. We do that less now. Restoration is a way to get back in the woods, and to get back in a way in which one is a real participant in the ecology of the woods or wetlands as was a hunter or fisher or gatherer, the classic ways in which people have lived in the landscape. But the sign of the relationship has been shifted from consumption to creation. So that means there痴 room for a lot of people in that landscape, the more the merrier really. Because they池e out there rebuilding it.
    That provides a base in experience for building a relationship. It also provides a base for the invention of rituals that we need to negotiate that nature-culture contract. That痴 how you add to your culture that valence that can help you connect, so the culture becomes capable of negotiating that relationship. Restoration is a key. We池e beginning to see little subcultures that have managed to reinhabit the natural landscape through this experience and this ritual.


 Air

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 Biodiversity

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 Energy, Climate, Ozone Depletion

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 Food and Agriculture

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 Hazardous Materials

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 Human Health

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 Parks, Open Spaces and Streetscapes

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 Solid Waste

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 Transportation

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 Water and Wastewater

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 Economy and Economic Development

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A Global Economy Won稚 Make the World Go Round in Peace:
A Conversation Between Shimon Peres and George Soros, Los Angeles Times
     SOROS: 典he global capitalist system -- the primary characteristic of which is the free flow of financial capital -- is base on the false premise that if competitors are left to their own devices, the whole system will tend toward equilibrium. Well, as the Asian crisis demonstrates, this is just not true.
    典he reality is the opposite: The system tends to break down. And it is not unstable due to some exogenous shock; it is inherently unstable. The idea that free markets will tend toward equilibrium is a theoretical construct from classical economics. But experience shows that as much as it may apply in the case of ordinary goods, it does not apply to financial markets.

Globalization: What You Don稚 Know Can Hurt You: Excerpts from a talk by Jerry Mander
    典o achieve rapid economic growth, globalization of course requires totally unrestricted free trade, privatization of enterprise, and deregulation of corporate activity. Together they remove all impediments that might stand in the way of expanded corporate activity. In practice, the impediments are usually environmental laws, or public health laws, or food safety laws, or laws that pertain to worker rights and opportunities, or laws that permit nations to control investment on their soil, or laws that try to retain national controls over local culture.

 Environmental Justice

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 Municipal Expenditures

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 Public Information and Education

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 Risk Management

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 Civic Renewal

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 Post-materialism

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Groping Toward Our Ecozoic Future: An Interview with Thomas Berry
    添ou see we are at the terminal phase of the Cenozoic, the last 65 million years. We池e not just passing into another historical period, or another cultural modification, we are changing the chemistry of the planet. We are changing the biosystems. We池e changing the geosystems of the planet on a scale of hundreds of millions of years. But more specifically, we池e terminating the last 65 million years of life development. Now a person would say, 展ell, where do we go from here? To my mind we go from the terminal phase, if we survive it, ... into a really sustainable world.
    We will be passing from the terminal Cenozoic into what I call the Ecozoic.